AI Handwriting Analysis Yields Clues To Authors Of A Dead Seas Scrolls Manuscript

AI Handwriting Analysis Yields Clues To Authors Of A Dead Seas Scrolls Manuscript

In 1946, with World War II over, archaeologists got back to work and over 10 years found discarded Hebrew Bible manuscripts in 12 Ein Feshkha Caves near the Dead Sea in the West Bank. Fragments o these \"Dead Sea Scrolls\" include the Apocrypha, except for the Book of Esther, which may not have survived over time.No one knows who printed most older works, for the Christian Bible it was anonymous monks, and the Dead Sea Scrolls also contain no attribution, but there has been speculation about who may have written them. Digital imaging makes all sorts of computer calculations possible, at the microlevel of characters, such as measuring curvature (called textural), as well as whole characters (called allographic).Two 12x12 Kohonen maps (blue colourmaps) of full character aleph and bet from the Dead Sea Scroll collection. The second scribe shows more variation within his writing than the first, although their writing is very similar.HandwritingIn the third step, the team produced a visual analysis. Then they produced an averaged version of this character for the first 27 columns and the last 27 columns.

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