Physicists Announce First Results of Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment

Physicists Announce First Results of Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment

By Hannah PellThe Muon g-2 experiment involves sending a beam of pions to circulate at nearly the speed of light around a storage ring, decaying into muons and muon neutrinos. (The first Muon g-2 experiment ever was constructed in 1959 at CERN). It’s certainly possible ; physicists have been long aware of its shortcomings, particularly the theory’s lack of explanation for neutrino masses, gravity, or dark matter. It may be too early to tell.“We’re really just getting started on this experiment,” said Fermilab physicist and Muon g-2 co-spokesperson Chris Polly during the press conference . “There’s much more data to come.” The Muon g-2 experiment has completed three runs of data-taking periods (Run-1, Run-2, and Run-3), an additional is currently ongoing (Run-4), and a fifth is planned (Run-5).Several open-access articles were published on the day of the announcement in Physical Review Letters Physical Review A , and Physical Review D , and one additional manuscript is forthcoming in Physical Review Accelerators and Beams, but is available on the arXiv

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